US Adds 1.3GW of Solar PV in 1st Quarter of 2015: GTM Research/SEIA


United States solar market continues its growth, fuelled by residential PV installations, which advanced by 76% (437MW) in the first three months of 2015.

Solar Energy Industries Association/Green Tech Media (GTM) Research, who co-publish the US Solar Market Insight quarterly reports on the state of the industry, said overall installations were 1.3GW in Q1 2015. This was the sixth straight quarter where more than 1GW of new solar capacity was added.

3664051538_29c9e77b02_z

Image Credit: Photon Energy via FlickrSome Rights Reserved

This also accounted for 51% of new US electricity generation brought online, said senior vice president of GTM Research Shayle Kann.

Kann expects greater than 3 million home solar installations in the next five years, thanks to a more extensive movement towards customers engaging in energy creation, management, and use.

California (not surprising) lead the way in 2015 first quarter installations, followed by Nevada, New York, North Carolina, and Massachusetts. Texas, New Jersey, Arizona, New Mexico, and Maryland, round out the top ten in new capacity

Image credit via: GTM Research / SEIA U.S. Solar Market Insight report

Image credit via: GTM Research

Prices also fell this past quarter for home solar systems by 10% compared to 12 months earlier, at $3.48/watt. This is especially good news for consumers who are looking to take advantage of solar’s falling prices, with improved technologies.

One interesting side note from this report which kind of surprised me was how North East US record snowfall this past winter did not hamper new solar capacity:

The Northeastern U.S. experienced one of its worst winters ever recorded, but that didn’t prevent the residential solar market segment from having its best quarter of all time. The first quarter tends to be the slowest time of the year for the solar market due to weather, accounting and tax considerations. Despite these headwinds, the residential market still grew 11 percent over last quarter, its previous high-water mark.

What this recent report is solar is becoming the real deal. It’s a testament when despite pitiful weather conditions could have hurt new solar pv in Northern Atlantic states, places like New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Maryland were in the top ten for new overall installations.

As SEIA president and CEO Rhone Resch said “Solar continues to be the fastest-growing source of renewable energy in the United States. By 2016, the U.S. will be generating enough clean solar energy to power 8 million homes.”

Resch added solar power can 8 million cars off the road, or 45 million metric tons of carbon dioxide.

Not bad, considering fossil fuels like Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson mocks renewables, despite its growth,and ignoring 97% of scientists who suggest climate change is real.

If you want to go deeper into this report go to the SEIA website, where you can download the report.

SolarCity Tops 6GWh, Doubled Electricity Generation Since April 2014


SolarCity keeps on rolling and breaks its own milestones at rapid rates.

According to a post on LinkedInthe top US solar panel installer on June 2nd reached 6GWh of solar electricity in a single day, doubling its generation rate in one day of 3GWh in April, 2014. SolarCity said on their LinkedIn page they “Can not wait to see what summer brings,” referring to reaching 7GWh soon.

It was only in late March they reached 5GWh, easily smashing 4GWh, two weeks prior.

I had predicted in the same CleanTechnica post 6GWh in solar electricity generation in a day was feasible by early summer for SolarCity, which they easily accomplished as noted by the below graph.

SolarCIty 6GWh Graph

Image: SolarCIty 6GWh via SolarCIty LinkedIn page

Even more astonishing is how fast this was achieved in five years to reach 6 GWh of solar electricity production. Consider, by 2013, only 1 GWh was produced in a day. Within two years it’s now six times that!.

Declining solar costs, driving climate change concerns will factor into SolarCity’s ferocious appetite to push clean electricity further.

All that solar power will come in handy as US energy demand could increase up to 95 gigawatts within the next 5-25 years, in order to meet cooling needs from increased heat waves.

With “The dog days of summer” on its way, and peak consumption period from the hot weather, I would not be surprised if SolarCity reaches 7GWh in a day by early July.

Until then, I am excited by the possibilities Lyndon Rive, SolarCity’s CEO & Co. have in store.